Monday, April 23, 2018

Another Busy Week


As long as I am taking these museum studies classes, it’s going to be busy. I spend the week reading and preparing assignments, while at the same time getting my real work done on my job. I have so much to edit and it’s going so slowly. It’s like I can’t do two things at once when I know with good time management I can. I should have done some reading yesterday, but I had a headache all day which makes it hard to concentrate. Hopefully, today will be a much better day and I can get a lot done. One night this week, I have to take out our guest speaker to dinner. I’m not particularly looking forward to this, but it’s part of the job. Then this weekend I have to visit yet another museum. Last week’s was an art museum, this weeks is a history museum. So much to do, so little time to do it in.

Sunday, April 22, 2018

Seeds of Deeds



The fruit of the righteous is a tree of life; and he that winneth souls is wise. (KJV) ( Proverbs 11:30 ) 

Has someone done something thoughtful for you lately?  Have they gone out of their way for you?  It's easy to keep moving on or get busy and forget about recognizing them.  However, it's important to express to them your grateful heart.  Put a little thought into how you want to express your gratitude through friendship. 

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Saturday, April 21, 2018

Moment of Zen: Sauna



When I was in graduate school, we had a great gym at the university and I used to love to go to the sauna and relax after a hard workout.

Friday, April 20, 2018

Need to Do


I have to admit, I haven’t gotten as much work done at my job as I needed to get done this week. I’ve been working on other stuff. I know I should focus on my job when at work, but there is so much to do. I can’t get it all done when I get home from work. Some days I’m just too tired. I will work extra hard today and try to get caught up.

Tomorrow, I will be going to an art museum for my museum class. I think I’ve mentioned that I have to go to a different type of museum each week, and this week is an art museum. I will be heading up to Burlington to visit the University of Vermont’s Fleming Museum of Art. The Fleming is supposed to have quite an interesting collection.

Thursday, April 19, 2018

Long Week


I was thinking last night that it’s been a long week. Then I realized that it was only Wednesday. I think I almost cried. Luckily, there are only two days left in the week. Work has been very busy, and what other time I have has been spent reading for my class. I’m behind in watching The Voice. It’s okay though, all of my favorites have been eliminated. Now we are down to my second tier folks. I haven’t gotten to vote because I didn’t watch the shows live. Work will be busy today. One thing I have to do is work on the paper that I am presenting at a conference next month. I have to edit it down from 25 minutes to 10-12 minutes. That’s half my paper. I’m so bummed. I had a really good paper, but it’s just too long. I also, and shhh because it’s not actually part of my job, but I need to write my assignment for my class this week. I’ve gotten most of it written, it just needs a few more things. So I’ve got those two things plus I still need to edit some more oral histories and I’ve got some emails that I have been putting off that need to be sent. There is just too much to do and not enough hours in the workday.

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

Goodbye, Mrs. Bush


Barbara Bush, the widely admired wife of one president and the fiercely loyal mother of another, died Tuesday evening. She was 92.

During her husband's 1992 presidential campaign, Barbara Bush stated that abortion and homosexuality are personal matters and argued that the Republican Party platform should not take a stand on them, saying that "The personal things should be left out of, in my opinion, platforms and conventions." Her personal views on abortion were not known, although her friends reported at that time that she "privately supported abortion rights." She explained, "I hate abortions, but I just could not make that choice for someone else.”

Not everyone liked her because she was outspoken and loyal to her family, but I always thought of her as a true lady who spoke her mind.




Tuesday, April 17, 2018

The Mock Song



The Mock Song

I swive as well as others do, 
I’m young, not yet deformed, 
My tender heart, sincere, and true, 
Deserves not to be scorned. 

Why Phyllis then, why will you swive, 
With forty lovers more? 
Can I (said she) with Nature strive, 
Alas I am, alas I am a whore. 

Were all my body larded o’er, 
With darts of love, so thick, 
That you might find in ev’ry pore, 
A well stuck standing prick; 

Whilst yet my eyes alone were free, 
My heart, would never doubt, 
In am’rous rage, and ecstasy, 
To wish those eyes, to wish those eyes fucked out.

John Wilmot (1 April 1647 – 26 July 1680) was an English poet and courtier of King Charles II's Restoration court. The Restoration reacted against the "spiritual authoritarianism" of the Puritan era. Rochester was the embodiment of the new era, and he is as well known for his rakish lifestyle as his poetry, although the two were often interlinked. He died at the age of 33 from venereal disease.

Monday, April 16, 2018

Cold



I have a bit of a cold, so I went to bed early last night.

Sunday, April 15, 2018

Work



And the LORD God took the man, and put him into the garden of Eden to dress it and to keep it. (KJV) ( Genesis 2:15 ) 

Do you dread Monday mornings? Work was God's first task to humans in the Garden of Eden. God didn't give us work to make us trudge along in our days. He did it so we could receive joy from our accomplishments, seek Him, and bring glory to His name. If you don't find what you are doing to be a labor of love, try changing your attitude. Or try changing your circumstances. 

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Friday, April 13, 2018

Dinner


I had a reception and dinner to attend last night at the university. So no real post today because I didn’t get in until late.

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Inappropriate? Indecent? What do you think?


A man claims he was sexually harassed at a New York City gym when three men in a steam room with him dropped their towels and started pleasuring themselves. 

The alleged victim has filed a lawsuit against the fitness chain Equinox, after claiming he was enjoying an afternoon steam at the location on Broadway in Gramercy Park last November.   

'I'm relaxing, I'm sitting in the corner, it's very meditative,' the man, identified in court papers as just GB, told the New York Post.

'The steam clears... And I look across from me. This gentleman, sitting pretty close, his towel is open, his legs are spread and he's looking right at me, and the guy next to him was rubbing [the man's] inner thigh. 

'He's looking right at me, his towel's off, and he's masturbating.' 

GB, who is a straight single father, told the paper that he then looked around and realized the third man in the steam room at the time was also masturbating.

He then said he panicked and thought he wouldn't be able to escape - worried the three men might overpower him and sexually assault him. 

The alleged victim then quickly left the steam room, dressed and went to the front desk to report the incident, but said staff members didn't take any action. 

He said the incident left him 'shaken up.'  

GB also alleges in the Manhattan Supreme Court Filing that Equinox 'has known for as much as 10 years prior that similar wrongful acts were occurring in its steam showers.' 

In a recording, taken by GB and obtained by the Post, the manager of the fitness chain location acknowledged it was a problem.

'It's something that every gym in New York City, not just Equinox, has an issue with,' the manager can be heard saying. 

The gym, where memberships cost upwards of $200 a month, told the Post it 'thoroughly investigates' complaints. 

A spokeswoman for the location said staff 'did exactly what in this case,' adding 'we maintain a zero-tolerance policy for any inappropriate behavior in our clubs.' 

But GB claims the gym refused to revoke the masturbators' memberships.   


From UK Daily Mail

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Random Thought


The other day, I overheard someone say that they “don’t believe in homosexuality.” What does that actually mean anyway? We aren’t something mythical. We aren’t ghosts. We are real, so there is no believe it or not. Homosexuality exists. I and many of you who read this blog attest to that fact. The thing is that what he really meant to say is that he doesn’t believe that homosexuality is a moral lifestyle. First of all, there is nothing moral or amoral about homosexuality, and second, it is not a lifestyle. It is a sexual orientation. This guy had it all wrong. He didn’t know what he was talking about. Even in liberal Vermont there are still people who feel this way, which is amazing to me. But it doesn’t matter what state or even country you live in there will always be those people who believe that homosexuality is wrong. One day, maybe that will change, but I’m afraid it’s a long way away.

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

By the Stream


By the Stream
by Paul Laurence Dunbar

By the stream I dream in calm delight, and watch as in a glass,
How the clouds like crowds of snowy-hued and white-robed maidens
pass,
And the water into ripples breaks and sparkles as it spreads,
Like a host of armored knights with silver helmets on their heads.
And I deem the stream an emblem fit of human life may go,
For I find a mind may sparkle much and yet but shallows show,
And a soul may glow with myriad lights and wondrous mysteries,
When it only lies a dormant thing and mirrors what it sees.



Monday, April 9, 2018

Fairbanks


Yesterday, as part of an assignment for the class I’m taking, I had to go to a natural history museum. I chose the Faibanks Museum in St. Johnsbury, VT. The Fairbanks Museum was founded in 1889 by St. Johnsbury industrialist Franklin Fairbanks.

Inside the classic Victorian building, you find a dazzling array of animals and artifacts, dolls and tools, shells and fossils, and much more! When Franklin Fairbanks opened the doors to this Museum in St. Johnsbury over a century ago, he invited all of New England to see beyond the horizon by bringing exquisite examples of natural science and beautiful artifacts from around the world to his home town. Inside, the collections include:

  • natural science specimens (mounted birds, mammals, reptiles and fish; insects; nests and eggs; shells; fossils; rocks and minerals; herbarium)
  • historical artifacts (tools; toys; dolls; textiles; weapons; archival photographs and documents)
  • ethnological items representing Oceania, the Near East, Africa, Egypt, Japan and native North America.

It was a small museum but very interesting. The sheer number of birds in the collection is astounding.

I’d have liked to have gone to another museum while I was there. The Atheneum, which is the public library and art museum is supposed to be quite fabulous but sadly it was closed on Sunday. Another museum was also closed on Sunday, and yet another was closed for the winter. So, I only got to see the Fairbanks Museum.

Sunday, April 8, 2018

Broken Walls






He that hath no rule over his own spirit is like a city that is broken down, and without walls. (KJV) ( Proverbs 25:28 )

God has given us a unique ability through the Holy Spirit...self-control. Unfortunately, we do a not-so-good job of letting our emotions, finances, and appetite for food get the best of us. Food is my major weakness. Merely shrugging our shoulders and accepting ourselves the way we are is not honoring to God. We should not allow ourselves to be at the mercies of our uncontrolled appetites. It is entirely possible to change. After all, we can do all things through Christ. Our body is a temple, and we should treat it as such.

Friday, April 6, 2018

It’s Friday Again


Yep, it’s Friday again. TGIF and all that. It’s been a busy week. I got in one or two more job applications this week. Plus, I’ve been super busy at work. I’ve been cranking out these oral history edits. My evenings have been spent working on my class. I’ve been reading and writing my assignments. It’s going to be a busy weekend. Saturday, I will be judging a history fair. Sunday, I have the assignment to go visit a natural history museum, so I will be driving up to St. Johnsbury, Vermont to visit the Fairbanks Museum. There is no rest for the weary.

Then on Monday, I will present the paper that I’m presenting at a conference in May to my coworkers. I’m hoping that goes well.  Also, Tuesday, I have an interview for an online adjunct teaching job. It’s at a major university, and I’m looking forward to talking with them. The job will be good experience if I get it. So it will be quite busy for some time to come.

In addition, we are looking at 1-3” of snow today.

Thursday, April 5, 2018

Needed Sleep


I made dinner then read the rest of my assignments for class and afterwards fell promptly to sleep. I must have been more tired than I realized. I didn’t wake until after 10 pm. So I wrote this and went back to sleep.

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Busy at Work


For the past two and a half years at the museum, I’ve rarely had busy days. In fact most of those days were spent trying to find something to do. Conducting oral histories only takes up an hour or so here and there, the real work comes when the oral histories are transcribed. Luckily, transcribing has never been a major part of my job as I loathe to transcribe. For me, the real work comes with editing the transcriptions to make sure they are accurate. This takes time. If I barrel through, I can get two done in a day, but it is usually just one. Once that is done, I have to mail the transcript and recording out to the interviewee for final approval. Getting the mailings ready usually takes between thirty minutes to an hour, according to how long it takes to burn the interview to CD. Currently, I have a lot of interviews transcribed for which I must do this process. The reason I had so little to do before is that my former boss only allowed me to get a few oral histories transcribed at a time, so between transcriptions I had very little to do. Now that the project is coming to an end, I was given permission to have the rest of the interviews transcribed, and so they have been. Now they must be edited and sent out for approval.

Once they are approved, then comes the real tedious part. They each have to be uploaded with their audio to the website. They then have to be indexed by subject and time stamped. This is a laborious process, but luckily, I have work study students doing this part for me on the ones that have been transcribed and approved. When all is said and done, we hope there will be a fully functioning website where the oral histories can be listened to and studies by future generations. There will also be a book compiled of excerpts from the oral histories, telling a unique history of the last 100 years of the university. There is a lot to do before the end of October, but I firmly believe that it will get done.


Tuesday, April 3, 2018

From you have I been absent in the spring (Sonnet 98)


From you have I been absent in the spring (Sonnet 98)
William Shakespeare, 1564 - 1616

 From you have I been absent in the spring,
When proud-pied April, dressed in all his trim,
Hath put a spirit of youth in everything,
That heavy Saturn laughed and leaped with him,
Yet nor the lays of birds, nor the sweet smell
Of different flowers in odor and in hue,
Could make me any summer’s story tell,
Or from their proud lap pluck them where they grew.
Nor did I wonder at the lily’s white,
Nor praise the deep vermilion in the rose;
They were but sweet, but figures of delight,
Drawn after you, you pattern of all those.
     Yet seemed it winter still, and, you away,
     As with your shadow I with these did play.


Monday, April 2, 2018

Back to School


In order to make myself more marketable searching for jobs, I’ve decided to go back to school to get a certificate in museum studies. It’s a three course program all online with Northwestern University. According to their website, “The Museum Studies certificate program unites history, theory and practical learning in a curriculum that prepares participants for professional or volunteer careers in administration, collections and specialty disciplines within museums, zoos, aquariums, parks and botanical gardens.” I am looking to be in the museum field for quite some time, but I need the credentials that this certification can give me. I will continue to look at community colleges for a return to teaching, but I’d really like to stay in museums. I’ve never taken an online course before, so this is a learning experience in more ways than one. Class starts today. I’ve already looked at some of the material and it looks quite manageable. I’m hoping this will be an enjoyable learning experience.


Sunday, April 1, 2018

Happy Easter

Now on the first day of the week Mary Magdalene came to the tomb early, while it was still dark, and saw that the stone had been taken away from the tomb. So she ran and went to Simon Peter and the other disciple, the one whom Jesus loved, and said to them, "They have taken the Lord out of the tomb, and we do not know where they have laid him." So Peter went out with the other disciple, and they were going toward the tomb. Both of them were running together, but the other disciple outran Peter and reached the tomb first. And stooping to look in, he saw the linen cloths lying there, but he did not go in. Then Simon Peter came, following him, and went into the tomb. He saw the linen cloths lying there, and the face cloth, which had been on Jesus' head, not lying with the linen cloths but folded up in a place by itself. Then the other disciple, who had reached the tomb first, also went in, and he saw and believed; for as yet they did not understand the Scripture, that he must rise from the dead. Then the disciples went back to their homes.

  But Mary stood weeping outside the tomb, and as she wept she stooped to look into the tomb. And she saw two angels in white, sitting where the body of Jesus had lain, one at the head and one at the feet. They said to her, "Woman, why are you weeping?" She said to them, "They have taken away my Lord, and I do not know where they have laid him." Having said this, she turned around and saw Jesus standing, but she did not know that it was Jesus. Jesus said to her, "Woman, why are you weeping? Whom are you seeking?" Supposing him to be the gardener, she said to him, "Sir, if you have carried him away, tell me where you have laid him, and I will take him away." Jesus said to her, "Mary." She turned and said to him in Aramaic, "Rabboni!" (which means Teacher). Jesus said to her, "Do not cling to me, for I have not yet ascended to the Father; but go to my brothers and say to them, 'I am ascending to my Father and your Father, to my God and your God.'" Mary Magdalene went and announced to the disciples, "I have seen the Lord"-and that he had said these things to her.
John 20:1-18

Easter, which celebrates Jesus Christ's resurrection from the dead, is Christianity's most important holiday. It has been called a moveable feast because it doesn't fall on a set date every year, as most holidays do. Instead, Christian churches in the West celebrate Easter on the first Sunday following the full moon after the vernal equinox on March 21. Therefore, Easter is observed anywhere between March 22 and April 25 every year. Orthodox Christians use the Julian calendar to calculate when Easter will occur and typically celebrate the holiday a week or two after the Western churches, which follow the Gregorian calendar.

For Jesus' mother, his disciples and his followers, Jesus' death was a tragedy. You can imagine that all hope was naturally gone. We today can face the same feeling. Many times in life, with homophobic politicians, the increasing rise of anti-gay homophobic groups, and everything that is going on in the world — war, famine, disease, natural disasters, discrimination, and hate — there can be a loss of hope and faith. Yet the resurrection gives us hope that no matter what has happened in our lives, no matter how much faith and hope we have lost, we can experience hope, we can overcome and regain whatever we have lost in our lives.

Our hope includes the knowledge that evil does not win. Sometimes today, it seems that the bad guy often wins. Sometimes it seems that the one who cheats, the one who lies, the one who steps on others to get ahead, is the one who prospers. Far too often, I read of this person cheating or that one (or catching a student cheating) or another kid, gay or otherwise, who has been bullied, lost hope, and committed suicide. How often do we read of politicians cheating, or working to make sure their businesses get the good contract? It seems that there is no hope for the little guy, the one who lives right, to ever get ahead.

With a positive attitude that through God we can accomplish anything, we truly can make the world a better place. With hope that springs eternal, just as the flowers in spring show the rebirth of the earth, we can be assured that God's promises will deliver a better day, a rebirth our faith. The promise that Jesus would rise from the grave on the third day is remembered every Easter Sunday, it is the greatest sacrifice God could give for our sins. When we are baptized, it is done in symbolic reverence as our old body dies in its watery grave to be reborn and rise from the dead as Christ did for our sins.